ALBUM REVIEW: EMILY ROWED POURS HER HEART OUT ON SOPHOMORE ALBUM 'APRIL'



Emily Rowed, a Vancouver electro-pop artist, pours her heart out on her latest release  – APRIL via 604 Records.

Rowed, who started out as more of a quiet, acoustic artist in 2012, changed up her sound two years later when Tiësto used her voice in his deep house remix of “Say Something.” Though she has strayed from her acoustic beginnings, Rowed hones an exquisitely delicate voice with mellow electronic beats and keys while never failing to showcase the introspective storytelling of her folk roots.

As Rowed's style continues to evolve, "the lyrics are still the personal stories that [she's] always written about. The sound is definitely bigger and busier, but the stories are still the same.”

Emily wrote APRIL about "the year [she] gave almost everything away and fell in love," in just 21 short days. She describes her sophomore full-length as “a party in the front and deep sorrow in the back." Her second album follows in the footsteps of her 2017 debut Electric Heart which has over one million streams on Spotify.

The ten emotion-filled tracks came to life after a year of traveling, living out of a suitcase, writing an album and falling in love in a completely unexpected way. Ahead of the album drop, Emily treated fans to a taste of the album with three singles including "Pinball" which has – already racked up over 130 thousand streams.

In the weeks leading up to its release, Rowed shared excerpts from eight songs along with explanations for each. In the opening track "Two Feet," Rowed recollects leaving her place and giving her things away on April 1st and about "all the moments [she] said goodbye." The songs flow similar to chapters in a book – navigating through the ups, downs and in betweens following a heartbreak.

The overall vibe on APRIL is melancholic throughout until Rowed picks up the pace six songs in with "Pinball." This track is striking, standing out from the others with a steady, upbeat tempo and a more chipper feel.

Nearing the end of the album, "Oh My God" chronicles "the moment it's really gone, the stomach drop moment." Rowed leaves the final two tracks – "My Friend" and "Stardust" up to the listener's interpretation. "Stardust" presents itself as a self-love anthem, on which Rowed reminds herself that she is made of "rhythm and stardust."

The undeniable sense of transparency and vulnerability in her lyrics give such depth to her songs, setting them apart from the typical pop song formula.

 

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