INTERVIEW: KASSIA KARRERA TALKS NEW SINGLE 'STOP IT,' HER UNIQUE ARTISTRY, VULNERABLE SONGWRITING + MORE

Photo by: Pablo Gaytan
Kassia Karrera wants you to "stream her personal business." The Montreal-based R&B singer-songwriter opens up with infectious hooks and real-life experiences that reverberate throughout her music:

I feel everything very deeply, and it’s a blessing and a curse. Everybody gets a little crazy in love, so I have no shame in taking accountability for some of the situations I’ve found myself in and singing about.


Following the February release of "In Too Deep," – a collaboration with Jacob Lacroix-Cardinal, whose credits spans from Charlie Puth to Offset, Rosalía and Young M.A, Karrera returns with another dark R&B banger. Written during quarantine this past April, she describes her newest single "Stop It" as a "sexy, emotional track" with "ethereal synths, heavy 808s and seductive vocals begging for answers."

Karrera goes all in on this soul-bearing song about meeting someone during a complicated time in her life: 

Solitude really forces you to take a look in the mirror and reevaluate your priorities and things that you want out of life at the moment. I think the main theme within the track is how bad timing plays a major role in the demise of a relationship.


Though she only released her debut song "Light Switch" less than a year ago, the enigmatic yet fiercely in-your-face songstress has been on a steady climb since. Currently working on her EP and eager to perform live, Karrera has no plans on slowing down. 

Q: How would you describe your sound? Any musical influences?


I’d describe my sound as a moody rnb/pop. I actually grew up on country and rock music, I think that’s why I’m drawn to dark minor chords for my production. I’m inspired by artists that really don’t give a f*ck, I think it’s alluring when it’s clear that someone is authentic to themselves. Lyricism that makes you almost a tad uncomfortable is my thing. I really like to say it how it is, raw and almost a bit tongue in cheek. Playing my music to friends and family for the first time is always so awkward for me. I’m like “yep, that’s what’s going on up here”.

Q: You posses a unique artistry, how important is it to stay true to yourself while navigating the music industry?


Thank you! I always had my own style and way of doing things growing up. I think the most important thing while navigating the industry is holding onto that passion that made you want to become an artist in the first place. Things don’t happen overnight, so you have to do it because you really love it. As an artist, your uniqueness is your strongest card you can play. Just stand out, be you. That, and being smart with your money. Financial organization is super important to me. It’s really easy to get sucked into the glitz and glam of the industry. Really navigating on a frequency of love and good intentions will attract the right people.

Q: Tell us about the creative process behind “Stop It.” Themes? Lyricism? Inspiration?


I wrote “stop it” during quarantine back in April. Solitude really forces you to take a look in the mirror and reevaluate your priorities and things that you want out of life at the moment. I think the main theme within the track is how bad timing plays a major role in the demise of a relationship. Personally, I had met someone at a complicated time in my life last year. “If you feel like you just cannot ride this part of life with me then be honest” is the first line of the hook. Funny enough, that sentence really did come out of my mouth during a conversation I had with someone one night. The hook is written as a conversation, and honestly that’s more or less how the real conversation went down. When I say “when we start, we can’t stop it,” I’m talking about everything, whether it be fighting, laughing, f*cking, you name it. It was always all or nothing, which is fun at first, but exhausting in the long run.

Q: Your music is very vulnerable and personal, considering you write about real-life experiences. What’s your songwriting process?


I have a love/hate relationship with songwriting. I like to write from a brutally honest perspective, and sometimes being honest with yourself about how you feel can be uncomfortable. I feel everything very deeply, and it’s a blessing and a curse. Everybody gets a little crazy in love, so I have no shame in taking accountability for some of the situations I’ve found myself in and singing about them. I always feel most connected to a song when I can tell the artist is expressing their truth, even if the truth is really messy and dysfunctional.

My process is always melody first. I'll find a flow I want to sing on and just freestyle over the beat a couple times. Then I write down the lyrical parts that I wanna keep, and start structuring what will go where. When I step in the booth, the track is rarely finished, I just like to start it and see where it takes me. Then I blast it and drive around in my car to finish it. I’d say 80% of my lyrics come to me while driving. I just feel inspired and open.

Q: What’s next for Kassia Karrera?


I'm currently working on an EP, but there will definitely be some more singles dropped before we get there. I have a crazy fun music video in the works as well that I’m super excited about. Once we’re allowed to open venues back up I’ll definitely be doing some very special shows that I have been planning. I live to perform and be on stage. My first song came out less than a year ago but I’m super grateful and blessed for the momentum I’ve picked up. I only see up from here.



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